OPIOID DEPENDENCE DATA

A 24-week, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of opioid-dependent (DSM-IV) outpatients, ≥18 years of age1,2

PIVOTAL STUDY DATA1,2

  • Prior to treatment initiation, patients were voluntarily seeking treatment, completing ≤30 days of inpatient opioid detoxification and not taking opioids for at least 7 days
  • Participants were randomized to receive VIVITROL (n=126) or placebo (n=124)
    • Every week—urine drug test
    • Every 2 weeks—psychosocial support
    • Every 4 weeks—treatment injection

OPIOID STUDY DESIGN1

Opioid study design

After randomization, there was a 4-week period for treatment engagement during which opioid use, if it occurred, was allowed. This period was not included in the analysis. Subjects provided additional self-report of opioid use.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA

  • Past/present history of an AIDS-indicator disease
  • Evidence of hepatic failure
  • Active hepatitis and/or aspartate aminotransferase or alanine aminotransferase >3 times the upper limit of normal

ENDPOINTS EVALUATING
THE EFFICACY OF VIVITROL1

PRIMARY ENDPOINT:
COMPLETE OPIOID ABSTINENCE

Response profile of patients who achieved complete abstinence during Weeks 5–24

  • Complete abstinence or "opioid-free" was defined as a negative urine drug test for opioids and no self-reported opioid use
  • Weeks 1-4 were omitted from this endpoint to allow for stabilization of abstinence

SECONDARY ENDPOINTS

  • Self-reported opioid-free days
  • Craving scores
  • Treatment retention days
  • Relapse to physiological opioid dependence

DEMOGRAPHICS AND CLINICAL BASELINE CHARACTERISTICS

  VIVITROL
(n=126)
Placebo
(n=124)
Age in years 29.4 (±4.8) 29.7 (±3.6)
Men 113 (90%) 107 (86%)
White 124 (98%) 124 (100%)
Duration of opioid dependence in years 9.1 (±4.5) 10.0 (±3.9)
Days of pre-study inpatient detoxification 18 (±9) 18 (±7)
Opioid craving scale 18 (±23) 22 (±24)
HIV serology positive 51 (40%) 52 (42%)
Hepatitis C positive 111 (88%) 117 (94%)

Data are mean (standard deviation [SD]) or number (%)


PRIMARY ENDPOINT:
COMPLETE OPIOID ABSTINENCE1,2*

With VIVITROL and counseling, more patients achieved complete abstinence vs placebo.

  • Complete abstinence was sustained by 36% of VIVITROL patients (n=45) compared with 23% of patients treated with placebo (n=28), during Weeks 5-24 (P=0.0224)

SUBJECTS SUSTAINING VARYING PERCENTAGES OF OPIOID-FREE WEEKS

Percentage of opioid-free patients chart
  • The median of the VIVITROL group had confirmed abstinence* for 90% of the weeks in the evaluation period vs 35% for the median of the placebo group

*Complete or confirmed abstinence was defined as a negative urine drug test for opioids and no self-reported opioid use. Psychosocial support consisted of bi-weekly counseling sessions of individual drug counseling, adapted for opioid dependence. Data were not collected during Weeks 1-4 of the trial to allow for stabilization of abstinence.


SECONDARY ENDPOINT:
SELF-REPORTED OPIOID-FREE DAYS

Patients treated with VIVITROL and counseling had 99.2% opioid-free days1

  • The median of the VIVITROL group reported 99.2% opioid-free days compared with 60.4% in the placebo group1
  • The median number of opioid-free days at baseline was zero for both the VIVITROL and placebo groups3

THE MEDIAN OF THE VIVITROL GROUP HAD 99.2%
OPIOID-FREE DAYS DURING WEEKS 1–241

The median of opioid free days chart

"Opioid-free" was defined as no self-reported opioid use. §Psychosocial support consisted of bi-weekly counseling sessions of individual drug counseling, adapted for opioid dependence.


SECONDARY ENDPOINT: CRAVING

In a pivotal trial, patients treated with VIVITROL experienced a reduction in opioid craving vs placebo.1

  • Craving (described as a "need for opioids") was reported weekly according to a visual analogue scale (VAS) of 0–100, with 0 being “none” and 100 "very much so"1
  • A statistically and clinically significant reduction in opioid craving was observed with VIVITROL vs placebo by Week 8 (P=0.0048), which persisted every week through Week 24 (P<0.0001, adjusted)1
  • Patients treated with VIVITROL had an average 10.1 decrease in baseline craving as measured by the VAS score, while patients who received placebo had a 0.7 increase in baseline craving as measured by VAS score (P<0.0001, adjusted)1

MEAN CHANGE IN SELF-REPORTED CRAVING1,3

Mean change in self-reported craving chart

Change in Mean Craving Score3

  • VIVITROL: 55% lower mean craving score at 24 weeks compared to baseline
  • Placebo: 3% higher mean craving score at 24 weeks compared to baseline

IIPsychosocial support consisted of bi-weekly counseling sessions of individual drug counseling, adapted for opioid dependence.


SECONDARY ENDPOINT:
TREATMENT RETENTION1

Among opioid-dependent patients treated with VIVITROL and counseling, median time in treatment was 1.7x longer than with placebo.

  • Patients receiving VIVITROL were significantly more likely to complete 6 months of treatment (n=67, 53%) compared with those receiving placebo (n=47, 38%; P=0.0171)
  • At the end of the study period (168 days), the median of the VIVITROL group had not dropped out1
    • The median time in treatment was >168 days for VIVITROL patients vs 96 days with placebo

THE MEDIAN OF THE VIVITROL GROUP HAD LONGER TREATMENT RETENTION VS PLACEBO

Time in treatment bar chart

Psychosocial support consisted of bi-weekly counseling sessions of individual drug counseling, adapted for opioid dependence.


SECONDARY ENDPOINT: RELAPSE TO PHYSIOLOGICAL OPIOID DEPENDENCE

Only 1 patient on VIVITROL (<1%) discontinued due to positive naloxone challenge, indicating physical dependence had been re-established, compared to 17 patients on placebo (14%)1

94% fewer naloxone-confirmed
relapses to dependence.1


ADVERSE REACTIONS IN OPIOID-DEPENDENCE CLINICAL STUDIES2

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Adverse reactions that occurred in ≥2% of patients with opioid dependence treated with VIVITROL and occurred more frequently in the VIVITROL group vs the placebo group.

  VIVITROL 380 mg with
Psychosocial Support
(n=126)
Placebo with
Psychosocial Support
(n=124)
Alanine aminotransferase increased 13% 6%
Aspartate aminotransferase increased 10% 2%
Gamma-glutamyltransferase increased 7% 3%
Nasopharyngitis 7% 2%
Insomnia 6% 1%
Influenza 5% 4%
Hypertension 5% 3%
Injection site pain 5% 1%
Toothache 4% 2%
Headache 3% 2%

Please see complete list of adverse events in the VIVITROL Prescribing Information.

DISCONTINUATION RATE

Discontinuation rate bar chart

Discontinuation rates due to adverse events were similar in opioid-dependent patients treated with VIVITROL vs patients treated with placebo.

DOWNLOAD THE VIVITROL BROCHURE TO DISCUSS WITH YOUR PATIENTS

The X:BOT study, “Comparative Effectiveness of Extended-Release Naltrexone Versus Buprenorphine-Nalaxone for Opioid Relapse Prevention,” provides additional useful information. Read about it now

VIVITROL is not right for everyone. There are significant risks from VIVITROL treatment, including risk of opioid overdose, injection site reactions and sudden opioid withdrawal.
See Important Safety Information below. Discuss all benefits and risks with your patients. See Prescribing Information and Medication Guide with your patients.

Request A Representative

REQUEST A REPRESENTATIVE

Request a visit from a VIVITROL representative to learn more about how VIVITROL may help your opioid- and alcohol-dependent patients.

REQUEST A REPRESENTATIVE

VIVITROL® Co-pay Savings Program

LEARN ABOUT THE VIVITROL® CO-PAY SAVINGS PROGRAM

Learn how the VIVITROL® Co-pay Savings Program may assist eligible* patients with out-of-pocket expenses for their VIVITROL prescriptions.

LEARN MORE

References:

  1. Krupitsky E, Nunes EV, Ling W, Illeperuma A, Gastfriend DR, Silverman BL. Injectable extended-release naltrexone for opioid dependence: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre randomised trial. Lancet. 2011;377(9776):1506-1513.
  2. VIVITROL [prescribing information]. Waltham, MA: Alkermes, Inc; rev September 2019.
  3. Data on file. Alkermes, Inc. Waltham, MA.

*Terms and Conditions

Eligibility for Alkermes-Sponsored Co-pay Savings. This offer is only available to patients 18 years or older, with a prescription consistent with the Prescribing Information and the patient is not enrolled in, or covered by, any local, state, federal or other government program that pays for any portion of medication costs, including but not limited to Medicare, including Medicare Part D or Medicare Advantage plans; Medicaid, including Medicaid Managed Care and Alternative Benefit Plans under the Affordable Care Act; Medigap; VA; DOD; TRICARE; or a residential correctional program.
Additional Terms of Use: This offer is not conditioned on any past, present, or future purchase, including refills. Alkermes reserves the right to rescind, revoke, or amend this offer, program eligibility, and requirements at any time without notice. This offer is limited to one per patient, may not be used with any other offer, is not transferable and may not be sold, purchased or traded, or offered for sale, purchase or trade. Void where prohibited by law. Program Administrator or its designee will have the right upon reasonable prior written notice, during normal business hours, and subject to applicable law, to audit compliance with this program.